The Blog


Last week I read about the sad findings in Gallop’s most recent “State of the
American Manager” Report.  It’s an interesting – if depressing – read.  It got me thinking about the core skills of
management talent.   These are:

* Motivator
* Assertiveness
* Accountability
* Relationships
* Decision Making

According to the report, the majority of managers fail every one.  On the face
of it they do not look that complicated, so let’s examine them and try and see
where most managers are going wrong.

1. Motivator:  They challenge themselves and their teams to continually improve
and deliver distinguished performance.

You’d think that this capability should be found in most management candidates.
It is not hard to see if someone is interested in accomplishment and
improvement.  Just look at their past history and how they have improved
themselves.

2. Assertiveness: They overcome challenges, adversities and resistance.

Have you put someone in a role where they will be overwhelmed?  How big are they
for the role?  You need someone who can get the arms around their management
role.  If they feel overwhelmed they will find it hard to be assertive.

The choice to put them in a role is the sum of their manager’s discretion.
Often this discretion gets undermined by weak objective measurements that
enable shoddy thinking and poor choices.

3. Accountability:  They ultimately assume responsibility for their teams ‘
success and create the structure and processes to help their teams deliver on
expectations.

If you hold a manager accountable for the outputs of their employees you will
get the above.  There can be no “Teflon Management” if a manager is held
accountable for their team’s output.  “There is nobody else to blame for poor
performance so I had better get on with building the best team I can and support
them with the required structure and processes”

4. Relationships:  They build a positive, engaging work environment where their
teams create strong relationships with one another and clients.

All of us know and can judge if someone can build relationships.  How dare you
put managers in charge of people when they don’t like people!!!!   It just a
fundamentally flawed decision that builds dark satanic mills – awful places to
work.  It is unconscionable act of lousy management

5.Decision-Making:  They solve the many complex issues and problems inherent to
the role of thinking ahead, planning contingencies, balancing competing interest
and taking an analytical approach.

They need a brain to do this!  Do not put a manager in a role who is not capable
of handling the complexity the work.  They will be overwhelmed, unable to sort
things out and delegate effectively to their employees.  These employees will
also work out quickly that their manager is “too stupid” for the role and cannot
help or team them much if anything.  It raises the odds of them disengaging from
their work pretty fast.

The truth is that none of this matters much unless the CEO and their Executive
really engage and care about structuring work of their company and staffing it
with right management capability and holding them accountable for effective
performance.  And, while the five dimensions of effective management might
appear common sense, Gallup says that in a whopping 82 percent of cases
organizations choose fail to choose the candidate with the right talent for the
manager job.

This is an abdication of CEO Management.  It is a shame and creates a wasteland
of human talent as described by Gallop in their 2015 report. The sad fact is
that as ill equipped most managers in large organizations are, it starts with a
basic CEO skills gap.

Closing that gap MUST be the priority for the majority of large organizations.

If you’re a manager Gallup’s latest “State of the American Manager” is painful
reading. Our profession is full of incompetent, overwhelmed managers who do not
care for the role they have chosen. As a result, they inflict pain and
suffering on those they are supposed to be managing. Only 35% of managers
are engaged, 51% are not engaged and 14% are actively disengaged.

In his introduction Gallup CEO Jim Clifton pulls no punches. “Most CEO’s I know
don’t care about their employees or take and interest in Human Resources”.  This
disinterest and disengagement costs the US economy $319 billion per year.

The report states that their research showed 1 in 2 – HALF of US employees left
their job to get away from their manager and improve their personal life at some
point in their career.  I can testify to that – it happened to me twice in my
early career. The report says that just 30% of workers are engaged in their
work and connected to their company.

I believe all employees have right when hired by a company to be given work that
grows their self-confidence and feeling of self worth. This is a common sense
and win-win for both the employee and the company. But, it requires managers
pay attention to their employees, manage them with respect, give them work that
interests them and enable them to learn and grow they will get higher levels of
engagement and quality of work.  It requires a framework for managers to acquire
the skills they need to manage large groups of people effectively.

The opportunity for improvement is massive. What CEO’s and their executives
think their management work is I do not know, but Gallup’s report suggests they
need to find out. And quickly!

Recently I was discussing the meaning of leadership and management with a CEO and how do describe the difference.  She uses a sports analogy that I thought was very good.

She  explained that leadership was a key skill to exhort, encourage and energize a group of football players before they started playing the game.  There are countless movies which portray leaders literally “exhorting their players to achieve the impossible” – I was told Al Pacino’s speech in Any Given Sunday is a great example so I checked it out.

Distil this to a business context and lead with the energy you feel comfortable with and  I believe this is a great definition of leadership. “I have a dream, you are part of a bigger enterprise and if we  all truly believe in the end goal we can achieve incredible things”.  Just say it in your own preferred manner and be authentic about it.

But, once they hit the football field it is all about management.  What is the plan of plays to win the game. You win a game of football by moving the chains forward.  The chains represent two measuring sticks attached to 10 yards of chain.  Ten yards is the required distance a team must achieve in four plays if they wish to retain the ball.  This allows the referees to accurately measure the yardage required if the distance becomes marginal before a play.  Teams that win focus on moving the chains forward – inch by inch, yard by yard – in order to achieve their goal.

This is only achieved with considerable planning.  The acquisition of the right talent, the integration and building of a team, clarity of everyones role on the team,  the development of the training process ensure the team is fighting fit, the planning of all the plays. There’s continual practice.  Practice, practice, practice until the plays are executed flawlessly.  There are truthful conversations about performance and the firing and hiring of replacement talent and finally the achievement of results so tangibly demonstrated each weekend.

Success in life as well as sport is achieved  by moving the chains forward.  It requires the tenacity and perseverance that builds unique success to those that will get the basics in place and then grind it out with passion.  Nobody ever said it was easy, but it can be superbly satisfying  at times.